Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

On the validity and reliability of the Computerized Memory Interference Test for primary Spanish-speaking individuals
by Karamians, Reneh, Psy.D., Pepperdine University, 2015, 138; 3734557
Abstract (Summary)

In this study, the Computerized Memory Interference Test (CMIT), a derivative of the Picture Memory Interference Test (PMIT) was assessed for reliability, validity and internal consistency with a primary Spanish-speaking sample. Five hypotheses were formulated and tested. For the first hypothesis correlational studies assessing relationships between the CMIT scores and those of the WMS-III, Visual Reproduction subtests were used to establish convergent validity. Hypotheses two and three, produced correlational studies to assess relationships between the CMIT scores and those of the RAVLT and WAIS-III Block Design, Vocabulary and Matrix Resonating subtests. To test the fourth hypothesis, known-group methods were used to assess the reliability of the CMIT. Cronbach’s Alpha was used to determine the internal consistency of the CMIT. Results indicated that the CMIT scores and those of the WMS-III, Visual Reproduction subtests correlated at a statistically significant level confirming convergent validity. Results also showed statistically significant correlations between the CMIT scores and the RAVLT subtest scores as well as those of the WAIS-III subtests. Due to these results, discriminant validity was not considered established. However, the CMIT did prove to be sensitive to detecting visual memory deficit, and internal consistency was also established for this population.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Rowe, Daryl
Commitee: Ho, Judy, Lopez, Enrique
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 77/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology
Keywords: Computerized, Interference, Memory, Reliability, Spanish, Validity
Publication Number: 3734557
ISBN: 9781339231792
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