Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Online faculty incivility and RN-BSN program satisfaction
by Byrnes, Sheri M., Ph.D., Capella University, 2015, 97; 3723153
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to identify whether a correlation exists between perceived online incivility experiences and RN-BSN student program satisfaction. This study used a cross-sectional, quantitative (correlational) survey method. There were 85 participants, 93% female and 7% male, with 89% of the respondents identifying as Caucasian, 6% Asian, 4% African American, and 1% as Pacific Islander. The age range was 20-64 years, with a mean age of 41.4 years. Of the participants in this study, 32% reported experiencing one or more occurrences of online incivility from faculty, primarily through emails. Online incivility and RN-BSN program satisfaction were found to produce a correlation coefficient of -0.32, which was significant and indicates a relationship of medium strength. Limitations of this study include a small sample size, the sensitivity of the topic, and survey responses based on memories of perceived experiences. Implications for practice include development of clear expectations with respect to faculty conduct, including a zero tolerance policy and an avenue through which students can freely report incivility. Further research should focus on identifying other variables that may contribute to online incivility and RN-BSN program satisfaction.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bronner, Julia
Commitee: Garner, Catherine, Paxson Barker, Dorothy
School: Capella University
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 77/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing, Health education, Higher education
Keywords: Faculty incivility, Higher education, Nursing programs, Online incivility, Student satisfaction
Publication Number: 3723153
ISBN: 9781339058146
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