Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Sacred Spaces: A Narrative Analysis of the Influences of Language and Literacy Experiences on the Self-Hood and Identity of High-Achieving African American Female College Freshmen
by Taylor, Michelle Flowers, Ed.D., Loyola Marymount University, 2015, 224; 3722850
Abstract (Summary)

Late-adolescent African American students face unique difficulties on their journey to womanhood. As members of a double minority (i.e., African American and female) (Jean & Feagin, 1998), certain limiting stereotypes relevant to both race and gender pose challenges to these students. They must overcome these challenges in order to excel within the various and changing environments they move through on a daily basis (hooks, 1981, 1994). Within the context of social justice, this dissertation provides insight into the role that language and literacy practices play to help enable the positive and affirming development of self-hood of African American college freshmen. This research is qualitative and employs critical narrative inquiry to analyze data collected from six academically high-achieving African American female freshmen college students attending Ivy League, Historically Black Colleges, and private and state universities in the United States.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lavadenz, Magaly
Commitee: Brown, Ruth Nicole, Darder, Antonia
School: Loyola Marymount University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 77/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Education, Gender studies
Keywords: African american, Girlhood, Identity, Language, Late-adolescents, Literacy
Publication Number: 3722850
ISBN: 978-1-339-05244-1
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest