Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Nurse Recognition and Documentation Rates of Delirium in Hospitalized in Older Adults: A Quality Improvement Project
by Nitta, Amy, M.S., University of California, Davis, 2015, 58; 1599507
Abstract (Summary)

Background: With the aging population, bedside nurses play a key role in recognition of delirium in older adults. The knowledge surrounding accurate assessment and documentation of delirium by nurses needs to be investigated.

Methods: A quality improvement project was implemented on an acute care floor in a teaching hospital using Plan, Do, Study, Act cycles. The first cycle was a gap analysis of the data to determine delirium incidence and Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) documentation and compliance. The second cycle included an online survey for RNs regarding knowledge of delirium and the CAM tool.

Results: Delirium was documented in only 29 of 511 patients. Length of Stay (p< 0.000002) and age over 60 (p< 0.0048) were important factors for the presence of delirium. Of nurse respondents, 59 percent had experience using the CAM tool for delirium assessment, but less than half of nurses surveyed felt knowledgeable about how to assess delirium.

Implications: Improving nurses' accurate identification of delirium can not be underemphasized and has system wide implications for mortality and cost due to the sequelae of this acute confusional state. This requires appropriate use of a standardized tool.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bakerjian, Debra
Commitee: Hass, Virginia M., Joseph, Jill G., Pares-Avila, Jose A.
School: University of California, Davis
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Gerontology, Nursing, Health care management
Keywords: Acute care, CAM tool, Confusion Assessment Method, Delirium, Documentation, Older adults
Publication Number: 1599507
ISBN: 9781339065687
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