Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Impacts of a constructed oyster bed on infaunal invertebrate communities in Jack Dunster Marine Reserve
by Champieux, Terrance M., M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2015, 65; 1598629
Abstract (Summary)

Oysters are important to estuarine ecosystems because of the functions they provide. Thus, oyster restoration projects are undertaken in areas where natural populations have declined. However, restoration techniques can impact sediment organic matter and benthic invertebrates that provide trophic support for important species. This study assesses the impacts of a constructed shell bed on associated sediment and invertebrate communities in a southern California bay. Within the bed site, organic matter, invertebrate abundance, and invertebrate species richness are lower only under the oyster bed. The alteration in the community under the shell is driven by a reduction in species. Tubificidae were the only remaining species under the shell. These results may be explained by the shells’ action as a barrier to the mud-water interface. While significant, impacts of oyster bed construction are spatially restricted to just under the bed. Longer-term studies should be conducted to address effects of the oysters themselves.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Whitcraft, Christine R.
Commitee: Pernet, Bruno G., Zacherl, Danielle C.
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Biological Sciences
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biology, Biological oceanography, Environmental management
Keywords: Ecosystem restoration, Infauna, Olympia, Oyster
Publication Number: 1598629
ISBN: 9781339038155
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