Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A quantitative study of critical thinking skills in bachelors of science nursing program students
by Schroder, Geoffrey L., Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2015, 176; 3714859
Abstract (Summary)

Critical thinking is an important aspect of nursing practice; however, nursing program graduates begin practice with less than adequate critical thinking skills. A quantitative study to determine whether any differences exist between students who graduate from traditional or accelerated baccalaureate of science nursing programs using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) was conducted using a total sample of 62 students from the Southwestern United States. A 2-way ANOVA of the data revealed no statistically significant differences in overall critical thinking skills between the two study cohorts. Differences were found in the subscale scores of induction and deduction based on subject age, years of work experience, and years of post-high school education. Regression analysis demonstrated subject age as the strongest predictor of overall critical thinking skill. Recommendations for nursing educators include incorporating cognitive problem-based strategies for building critical thinking skills in nursing students and focusing recruitment efforts on older students with a work history and prior college education. Suggestions for further research include replication of the study with a larger sample size, and the use of different critical thinking instruments.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Graham, George J.
Commitee: Barclay, Kathleen, Zografos, Peter
School: University of Phoenix
Department: School of Advanced Studies
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 76/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing, Health education, Higher education
Keywords: Accelerated nursing program, Baccalaureate nursing, Critical thinking, Nontraditional education, Nursing students
Publication Number: 3714859
ISBN: 978-1-321-92655-2
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