Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An Analysis of Corporal Punishment Practices in Texas Public Schools: Race, School District Size, Academic Performance, and Policy Influences
by Prejean, Kerri D., Ed.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2015, 368; 3712834
Abstract (Summary)

Corporal punishment in the public schools is legally authorized in 19 US states. Research suggests that inflicting corporal punishment to control student behavior does not produce the intended results. Research demonstrates that this form of punishment is associated with aggressive behavior, lack of confidence and self-worth, lower student achievement scores, and limited cognitive functioning, and also may result in a future of violent and criminal behaviors. Research suggests that using alternative forms of discipline and control, such as Positive Behavior Support (PBS), may produce the exact opposite effect – higher test scores, higher self-esteem, and a more positive outlook and proactive problem solving.

The research adopted in this analysis of corporal punishment in Texas public schools includes a multiple methods approach with the use of online literature, print literature, school board polices, and research database sites. The findings from this research identify patterns in corporal punishment policies and practice, including analyses of district type, race, academic performance, and socioeconomic status. Research methods used in this analysis of corporal punishment in Texas include document, descriptive, and statistical analyses.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Fossey, William
Commitee: Slater, Robert, Sughrue, Jennifer, Trahan, Mitzi
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: DAI-A 76/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education Policy, School administration
Keywords: Corporal punishment, Discipline, District size, Public schools, Texas
Publication Number: 3712834
ISBN: 9781321899078
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