Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Influence of Facebook and Skype on Acculturative Stress and Perceived Social Support among Latin American Guest Workers
by Rudyk, R. Brandon, M.S., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2015, 76; 1594177
Abstract (Summary)

Since the late 1990s, access to Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have seen exponential growth throughout the globe, which the World Bank (2014) estimated to have reached 6.8 billion mobile subscribers, and 2.7 billion Internet users at the end of 2013. This growth is primarily fueled by expanding mobile wireless networks, decentralized telecommunication infrastructures, and innovative mobile and computer based applications. This unprecedented access to technology, coupled with globalization, is bringing multiple cultures closer together in the ever increasing transfer of labor between countries. International guest workers set out to create better lives for themselves and their families with their mobile phone in one hand and worldly possessions in another. Ultimately, these devices are allowing guest workers to connect with their home countries, in an exchange of information and ideas. International guest workers who live dual lives have one foot firmly planted in their home culture while trying to adapt to life in a new country and culture. This adaption, or acculturation, creates a tremendous amount of adjustment and stress. Acculturative stress can arise from financial difficulties, language barriers, discrimination, or extended detachment from one's family (Berry, 1997). Facebook and Skype can provide entertainment, locate employment, and bridge the emotional gaps that are created from the extended absence from one's friends and family. In this paper, we will examine the perception of acculturative stress and perceived social support from Latin American Guest Workers. This quantitative study will measure specifically the effects of Facebook and VoIP (Skype) on increasing the feelings of perceived social support while reducing the feelings associated with acculturative stress.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Auter, Philip
Commitee: Davie, William R., Dinu, Lucian F.
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Communication
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: MAI 54/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Social psychology, Communication, Latin American Studies, Web Studies
Keywords: Acculturative stress, Facebook, Homophily, Latin american guest workers, Perceived social support, Skype
Publication Number: 1594177
ISBN: 9781321909821
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