Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Blended learning in context: An exploration of the effectuality of math blended learning programs on minority students' standardized test scores
by Verrett, Shannon Jennifer, Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2015, 143; 3713705
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this quantitative research study was to determine whether or not adopting a school-wide math blended learning (MBL) model led to significant differences in the Algebra I math standardized test scores on the California Standards Test (CST), between underrepresented minority students from Title I high schools in Los Angeles who had a school-wide MBL program during the 2011–2012 school year compared to underrepresented minority students from Title I high schools who did not have a school-wide MBL program. This study focused on the efficacy of the math intervention program, and was intended to further research in the area of blended learning. An one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) data analysis technique was utilized and an alpha level of .05 was set as the criterion for the level of significance. Archived pre-existing standardized test data was collected from the 2011-2012 school year. The sample size consisted of the mean Algebra I CST test scores from African-American and Latino 9th grade students from 14 different Title I high schools in Los Angeles, CA. Select Title I high schools were matched to a comparison group of Title I high schools based on gender, ethnicity, and charter school designation. The results from hypotheses one, two, three, four, and five reflect that female and male African-American and Latino students who attended a Title I high school with a school-wide MBL program had a statistically significant difference in Algebra I scores compared to the students who did not. Hypothesis six indicated that there was not a statistically significant difference in Algebra I scores of students who attended Title I charter high schools compared to students who attended Title I non-charter high schools. For hypotheses one, two, three, four, and five the trend was in favor of the MBL programs. Overall, the statistical analysis indicated that there was strong evidence that MBL programs had a significant positive impact on the Algebra I test scores of all of the students who attended Title I high schools with a school-wide MBL program as compared to the students who attended a Title I high school without a school-wide MBL program.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mallette, Leo
Commitee: Ball-Parker, Gayle, Schmieder-Ramirez, June
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 76/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mathematics education, Educational sociology
Keywords: Blended learning, Math education, Test scores
Publication Number: 3713705
ISBN: 978-1-321-90358-4
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