Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Relaxation Skills Training for Elementary Aged Children
by Roediger, Erik, Ed.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2015, 57; 1589170
Abstract (Summary)

Children and adolescents in today's society are exposed to increasing amounts of anger, stress, and harmful situations. An important point of focus for this exposure is to consider how children respond to negative aspects of society. There are different ways that children can respond to harmful, stressful, or anger provoking situations. Children's responses can be characterized by internalizing or externalizing behaviors. Internalizing reactions can include increased feelings of anger or anxiety. On the other hand, externalizing reactions to stressful or anger provoking situations can include verbal and physical aggression, risk taking behaviors, and poor academic performance.

However, it is important to consider the interplay between internalizing symptoms and externalizing behaviors. A study conducted by Priddis et al. (2014) compared clinically aggressive children with non-aggressive children. Their results indicate that clinically aggressive children were significantly more likely to have internalizing symptoms such as depression or anxiety. Internalizing and externalizing behaviors can also lead to poor interpersonal relations. Another finding from the Priddis et al. (2014) study illustrates that social problems were a significant predictor of aggression in children.

Increased feelings of anxiety, anger, and social problems can induce negative coping strategies. A study conducted by Michels et al. (2015) found that stressful situations can impact a child's lifestyle. Specifically, Michels et al. (2015) found that stressful situations can increase unhealthy food consumption. Moreover, a Lin and Yusoff (2013) found that high school children under distress commonly used negative coping strategies to handle their anxiety. Increased feelings of anger have been found to be associated with externalizing coping strategies, such as acting out (Vierhaus & Lohaus, 2009). A study conducted by Fives, Kong, Fuller, and DiGuiseppe (2011) researched whether anger and hostility would lead to aggressive behaviors. The results of this study concluded that males are more likely to be perceived as aggressive by their peers. Also, anger and hostility significantly predicted aggressive behaviors. Thus, there is a significant interaction between feelings of anger and aggressive tendencies.

Increased feelings of anxiety, anger, and social problems can induce negative coping strategies. A study conducted by Michels et al. (2015) found that stressful situations can impact a child's lifestyle. Specifically, Michels et al. (2015) found that stressful situations can increase unhealthy food consumption. Moreover, a Lin and Yusoff (2013) found that high school children under distress commonly used negative coping strategies to handle their anxiety. Increased feelings of anger have been found to be associated with externalizing coping strategies, such as acting out (Vierhaus & Lohaus, 2009). A study conducted by Fives, Kong, Fuller, and DiGuiseppe (2011) researched whether anger and hostility would lead to aggressive behaviors. The results of this study concluded that males are more likely to be perceived as aggressive by their peers. Also, anger and hostility significantly predicted aggressive behaviors. Thus, there is a significant interaction between feelings of anger and aggressive tendencies.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Jewell, Jeremy
Commitee: Hupp, Steven, McKenney, Elizabeth
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 54/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Elementary education, Educational psychology, Developmental psychology
Keywords: Anger, Anxiety, Elementary aged children, Relaxation skills
Publication Number: 1589170
ISBN: 9781321763027
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