Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A study of the efficacy of the flipped classroom model in a university mathematics class
by Quint, Christa Lee, Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 2015, 147; 3707108
Abstract (Summary)

The flipped classroom is an emerging teaching practice in which teachers employ a variety of methods to offload direct instruction prior to class and use class time to engage students in active learning. Despite its rapid rise in popularity over the past five years, there are relatively few studies on the efficacy of the flipped classroom teaching model. Of these studies, few use control groups to measure changes is student learning and even fewer use iterative analysis to determine the impact that successive implementation has on the efficacy of the flipped classroom model. This study addresses this gap by measuring the efficacy of a flipped classroom against a traditionally-taught class in two successive semesters. Results showed that the flipped classroom teaching method increased student learning during the second semester of the study. It also found that successive implementation of the flipped classroom was more effective at producing gains in measures of student learning outcomes than a class taught traditionally. Finally, the findings from this study were used to develop recommendations for educators interested in implementing the flipped classroom teaching model.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Walker, Erica
Commitee: Grabois, Neil, Tipton, Elizabeth, Wasserman, Nicholas
School: Teachers College, Columbia University
Department: Mathematics, Science and Technology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-A 76/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mathematics education, Educational technology
Keywords: Active learning, Blended learning, Flipped classroom, Inverted learning, Lecture video, Mathematics education
Publication Number: 3707108
ISBN: 9781321814705
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