Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Why parents choose to open enroll children into a rural school district
by Rollefson, Mark, Ed.D., Edgewood College, 2015, 136; 3705735
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine considerations that a sample of parents identified as influential when deciding to open enroll their children into a specific Wisconsin school district. Under Wisconsin Act 27, parents have the right to choose their children's public school through so-called open enrollment. This act also provides for state funding of public schools based in part on student enrollment. If a public school district's student enrollment increases, state funding increases. In recent years the district in this study experienced significant net loss in student enrollment and funding. As a result, programming, salaries, curriculum, facilities, and more were adversely affected. A survey was administered to a convenience sample of 64 families out of a target population of 117. Results indicated school culture and relationships were reportedly primary influences on parents' decisions to open enroll into the study district. Additionally, quality of academics was reported as an influential consideration. Stakeholders may incorporate these considerations when planning marketing and public relations strategies. Findings from this study may provide stakeholders with ways to attract and maintain students in the study district, and may also assist policymakers.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: VanDeuren, Amy, Evert, Tom
Commitee: St Maurice, Henry
School: Edgewood College
Department: Department of Education
School Location: United States -- Wisconsin
Source: DAI-A 76/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: School administration
Keywords: Business model, Open enrollment, School choice, School competition, Vouchers
Publication Number: 3705735
ISBN: 9781321790719
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