Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

American dream disrupted: An exploration of higher education and civic experiences of Latina/o deferred action childhood arrivals in Arizona
by Johnson, Carol E., Ed.D., Northern Arizona University, 2015, 168; 3705449
Abstract (Summary)

Education attainment rates for Latina/os in the United States have significant discrepancies including a 44% high school graduation rate and students of Latina/o descent comprise two-thirds of the overall undocumented high school graduate composition (Perez, 2009; Yosso, 2006). Undocumented Latina/os seeking to matriculate into higher education also face racism, nativism, and substantial institutional barriers. Contending with these challenges, thousands of undocumented Latina/o high school graduates attempt to achieve a higher education annually as they also experience precarious legal situations.

The purpose of this qualitative interview study was to explore the educational and civic experiences of individuals who self-identify as Latina/o and have Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Interview data was used to develop counterstories that demonstrate how these individuals are navigating their non-majoritarian lives. The study highlights where DACAmented Latina/os find barriers in education and how they utilize civic engagement and social wealth found in the larger undocumented community to develop themselves personally and professionally as they anxiously await comprehensive immigration reform.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Wood, Gerald K.
Commitee: Aleman, Sara, Castagno, Angelina E., Hall, Melvin
School: Northern Arizona University
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 76/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Latin American Studies
Keywords: Critical race theory, Deferred action for childhood arrivals, Dream act, Latcrit, Racist nativism, Undocumented
Publication Number: 3705449
ISBN: 978-1-321-78502-9
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest