Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

College Faculty Perceptions: Examining Student Engagement in the Classroom
by Dempsey, Marcia L., M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2015, 52; 1588775
Abstract (Summary)

Studies have shown that when students are engaged, learning increases. This research paper examines the perceptions of a Midwest university faculty's perceptions about student engagement in the classroom. Using qualitative methodology, interviews were conducted with faculty who are currently college classroom teachers, providing rich data to further examine the concept of student engagement. The following questions were asked with responses from the perspective of the college professor: what is student engagement, how does personal experience influence the way teachers perceive student engagement, and how do traditional classrooms influence engagement? The theory of symbolic interactionism and dramaturgy were used to gain perspective into professors' perceptions of student engagement, demonstrating how the traditional education received by present-day teachers has influenced their perceptions of student engagement in their classrooms (Sterling 2001; Bain 2004; Barkley 2010; Kuh et al. 2010; Thoms 2010).

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Markowitz, Linda
Commitee: Finkelstein, Marvin, Spurlock-Frey, Connie
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice Studies
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 54/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational sociology, Behavioral psychology, Educational psychology
Keywords: Active participation, Instructor, Learning, School engagement, Student engagement
Publication Number: 1588775
ISBN: 9781321750652
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest