Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Socialized Aggression: Hypermasculinity and Sexual Assault in the United States Military
by Schmidt, Daniel, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2015, 60; 1588672
Abstract (Summary)

Sexual assault has been identified as an epidemic within the United States military, with estimates of as many as 80% of female service members facing sexual assault or sexual harassment while on active military duty (Turchick & Wilson, 2010). This study examined the sexual assault epidemic as a cultural phenomenon and surveyed 94 male, active duty members of the United States Army. The participants were recruited via network sampling, and their age, time in service, level of socialization, and expectation of combat were measured. A total of four research questions were examined. Multiple correlation analyses identified positive relationships between hypermasculine ideologies and expectation of combat, hypermasculine ideologies and group socialization, and hypermasculine ideologies and task socialization. Negative relationships were identified between hypermasculine ideologies and age, as well as between hypermasculine ideologies and time in service. Data suggests that military Basic Training is an important aspect in the development of hypermasculine ideologies within the United States Army.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Schaefer, Zachary
Commitee: Cheah, Wai Hsien, Wrobbel, Eric
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Speech Communications
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 54/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication
Keywords: Hypermasculinity, Sexual assault, Socialization, United States army
Publication Number: 1588672
ISBN: 9781321747201
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest