Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Teachers' Perspectives of the Effects of Project-Based Learning on the Academic Performance, Socialization Skills, and Self-Concepts of Incarcerated Juveniles
by Koss, Paulette, Ed.D., Brandman University, 2015, 190; 3689516
Abstract (Summary)

Teachers' Perspectives of the Effects of Project-Based Learning on the Academic Performance, Socialization Skills, and Self-Concepts of Incarcerated Juveniles By Paulette Koss The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine and describe the impact of the Buck Institute of Education's 8 components of project-based curriculum on high school juvenile offenders' academic achievement, socialization, and self-concepts as perceived by juvenile court school (JCS) teachers. A secondary purpose was to describe strategies used to implement the 8 components of project-based curriculum for high school juvenile offenders as perceived by JCS teachers using the project-based learning (PBL) approach. The participants in the study were 9 JCS teachers in 3 states. They answered interview questions about the impact of the 8 components of PBL on their students' academic performance, socialization, and self-concepts, and about effective strategies for implementation. The results were analyzed to identify themes. Overall, the participants noted that PBL improved the academic performance, socialization skills, and self-concepts of their students. Their answers also indicated some obstacles to implementing PBL, especially the lack of Internet access in JCS classrooms. The teachers also noted that their students lacked academic and experiential background knowledge and appropriate peer socialization skills. Building background knowledge and modeling peer interactions were identified as essential strategies in implementing PBL. The results of this study support the conclusion that PBL is effective at improving the academic performance, socialization skills, and self-concepts of incarcerated juveniles. Results indicated that the lack of Internet access limited the benefits of PBL for these students. Building background knowledge and modeling appropriate peer interactions were crucial strategies to the success of PBL. The researcher recommends that more states implement initiatives for implementing PBL in their JCS classrooms and provide teachers with the necessary training and ongoing coaching necessary for implementation. Additionally, states should develop systems that would allow for Internet access in JCS classrooms without compromising the secure facility. Programs should be developed to encourage positive peer interactions in incarceration facilities.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: DeVore, Douglas
Commitee: Capellino, Tamerin, Mahabir, Joseph
School: Brandman University
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 76/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation
Keywords: Incarcerated juveniles, Incarcerated minors, PBL, Project-based learning
Publication Number: 3689516
ISBN: 978-1-321-68977-8
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