Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Fashioning Spain: National identity in Goya's portraits
by Salomone, Tricia R., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2015, 58; 1585815
Abstract (Summary)

Francisco Goya is perhaps best known as the author of the dramatic painting, Third of May and the dark Disasters of War series. Though these works have become a visual reference point for the French invasion of Spain and subsequent peninsular wars, Goya had illuminated the growing tensions between France and Spain long before those canonical works. I am returning to his late-eighteenth-century portraits of aristocratic women and, more specifically, to the shifts in fashion depicted therein. In this thesis, I trace the shift in Spanish fashion, as evidenced through Goya's portraits of women, from the adoption of the French style to the creation of a distinct Spanish style. Through this change, I argue that Spain declared a national identity of culture and fashion apart from France. While these broad ideas of socio-political tension between Spain and France emerge in my argument, Goya's attention to detail simultaneously reveals that the women of Spain never fully adhered to the fashionable French Enlightenment philosophies regarding gender roles. This thesis will be supported by the analysis of portraits by Goya, and three in particular: The Duchess of Osuna, The Duchess of Alba, and Maria Luisa with Mantilla.

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Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Simms, Matthew
Commitee: Kleinfelder, Karen, Paquette, Catha
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Art, School of
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 54/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Art history, Womens studies, Gender studies
Keywords: Enlightenment, Fashion, Goya, francisco, Maja
Publication Number: 1585815
ISBN: 9781321652017
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