Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Male teacher perspective on the recruitment of male elementary teachers: A phenomenological study
by Hood, Edwin P., Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2015, 135; 3691411
Abstract (Summary)

To increase the number of male teachers at the elementary level in public education, the use of recruitment strategies is necessary. The problem is a lack of literature concerning recruitment strategies for male educators in elementary education. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to understand the perceptions of male teachers and district recruiters to identify common themes of recruitment used in school districts in Texas to procure more males at the elementary public education level. This study was framed through theories of social cognition and self-efficacy. A sample of 23 male teachers from elementary and secondary public education provided responses to 16 openended survey questions. Using Nvivo10, four major themes were identified based on keyword weighted percentage: recruited and applied, viewed as masculine, elementary men are stereotyped as feminine, and recruit using males in current positions of employment. The findings revealed recruitment strategies identified by male teachers that could influence more males to teach at the elementary level as well as factors that influence males to work at this education level. This study authenticates recruitment strategies to employ more males at the elementary level in public education.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Reason, Casey
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 76/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Elementary education, Gender studies
Keywords: Elementary teachers, Human resources, Male stereotypes, Male teacher recruitment, Male teachers
Publication Number: 3691411
ISBN: 978-1-321-64705-1
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