Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Factors contributing to the perception of physicians' listening
by Delgado, Adam, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2015, 46; 1585634
Abstract (Summary)

This study analyzes different demographic groups and the ability to understand a physician and how this contributes to feeling carefully listened to. There are four hypotheses being tested, each predicting a different group within each variable will feel the most carefully listened to. The Statistical Package for Social Services (SPSS) was used to analyze data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). The portion of the survey that focused on adults was utilized in this study. Data was analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA tests. The results of the study determined that the elderly, males, and participants that could understand their physician felt the most carefully listened to for each variable. As for race, Whites, African American, and participants that identified as more than one race felt more carefully listened to when compared to Asians and participants that identified as a race not specified. These finding only supported one hypothesis, participants that understood their physician would feel that most carefully listened to. Theses result are a valuable tool that can be used to being quality improvement efforts focused on patient centered communication.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Reynolds, Grace
Commitee: Shimoga, Sandhya, Sinay, Tony
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Health Care Administration
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 54/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Health care management
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1585634
ISBN: 9781321642865
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