Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

More than a number: A phenomenological study of high stakes education as experienced by students.
by Salas-Sarmiento, Estela, Ed.D., California State University, Fullerton, 2014, 111; 3662515
Abstract (Summary)

This hermeneutic phenomenological study explores what students experience and how students experience the phenomenon of high-stakes testing (HST) education. The research aimed to add to current research the missing voices of students and to explore the need to include the social–emotional impact of education in the narrative of HST education. The study's intent was to help educators comprehend the full spectrum of the impact HST education has on students and the role that educators and other stakeholders play in creating that experience.

The study includes a comprehensive understanding of how students of today consider passing a test and learning are one and the same by examining how students position themselves as consumers of education over creators of their education. Moreover, the research examines how values and beliefs of the school affect students' outlook on education. Finally, a critical review of how HST phenomenon denies low-performing students real opportunity. This research validates the idea that standardizing learning and its results are fundamentally flawed if the intent is to create real opportunity for all students. The study concludes with practical recommendations to help reestablish school ideals and real opportunities for all students.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Choi, Daniel
Commitee:
School: California State University, Fullerton
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 76/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Instructional Design, Education
Keywords: Critical Theory, High Stakes Testing, Intervention, Phenomenology, Soft Skills, Testing
Publication Number: 3662515
ISBN: 978-1-321-63674-1
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