Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Acculturation, transnational ties, and depressive symptoms in Vietnamese immigrants
by Nguyen, Xuan Vu, Ph.D., New Mexico State University, 2014, 164; 3582405
Abstract (Summary)

This study explores the relationships between acculturation, transnational ties, and depressive symptoms in a community sample of Vietnamese immigrants and descendants. Research indicates that immigration-related factors such as acculturation (Berry, 1980; Suinn, 2010) and transnational ties (Murphy & Mahalingam, 2004) are important in understanding elevated depressive symptoms in Vietnamese immigrants (Leung, Cheung, & Cheung, 2010) and other immigrant populations. Empirical research, however, has yet to examine acculturation, transnational ties, and depressive symptoms concomitantly. To fill this gap, the current study employed both a mediation and a moderation framework to separately examine whether transnational ties mediated or moderated the relationships between dimensions of acculturation and depressive symptoms. The sample comprised of pilot study (N = 37) and dissertation study (N = 107) participants who were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling in the Southwest and Midwest regions of the United States. Participants completed surveys comprised of demographic information, the Asian American Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AAMAS; Chung, Kim, & Abreu, 2004), the Transnationalism Scale (TS; Murphy & Mahalingam, 2004), and the Center for Epidemiological Study of Depression scale (CES-D; Radloff, 1977). No mediation effects were found for transnational ties as a mediator between the associations of acculturation dimensions with depressive symptoms. Significant moderation effects were found for the Financial and Commercial Ties aspect of transnational ties in moderating the relationship between acculturation to the Vietnamese culture and depressive symptoms. As acculturation to the Vietnamese culture increased, levels of depressive symptoms decreased, and the decrease in depressive symptoms was more pronounced for Vietnamese immigrants who reported higher levels of Financial and Commercial Ties compared to those who reported lower levels. When acculturation to the Vietnamese culture was high, participants with high Financial and Commercial Ties had lower depressive symptoms than those with the same level of acculturation but engaged in low Financial and Commercial Ties. However, for participants with low identification with the Vietnamese culture but engaged in high Financial and Commercial Ties, their depressive symptoms were higher than those with the same low identification with the Vietnamese culture but engaged in low Financial and Commercial Ties.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Cheng, Hsiu-Lan
Commitee:
School: New Mexico State University
School Location: United States -- New Mexico
Source: DAI-B 76/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Asian American Studies, Counseling Psychology, Psychology
Keywords: Acculturation, Depressive Symptoms, Ethnic identity, Transnational Ties, Transnationalism, Vietnamese Immigrants
Publication Number: 3582405
ISBN: 9781321620627
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