Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

"Your guess is as good as mine": Exploring public interpretation through applied archaeology
by Welch, Stephanie M., M.A., Northern Arizona University, 2014, 121; 1571872
Abstract (Summary)

Theoretical approaches to anthropology and archaeology can affect the world in unexpected ways. Professional ethical principles and guidelines encourage practitioners to think critically about the effects of research designs, methods, and the theoretical frameworks employed to understand and interpret information and experiences. Interested parties, constituent communities, and stakeholders are all buzzwords used in the profession to identify the people and groups who may be interested in anthropological and archaeological work. Public interpreters make up a stakeholder community who are often overlooked or neglected by archaeologists. This thesis employs an applied approach to the public interpretation of archaeological heritage to understand better the relationship between archaeologists and the public interpreters who consume and disseminate archaeological knowledge. Applied approaches to the public interpretation of archaeological heritage reveal how disciplinary thought can permeate policies and practices in other institutions and communities. Public interpreters are a stakeholder community with whom archaeologists must engage to understand the role of archaeology in the world, to maintain social relevancy of the discipline, and effectively fulfill ethical obligations.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hays-Gilpin, Kelley
Commitee: Thompson, Kerry, Vannette, Walter
School: Northern Arizona University
Department: Anthropology
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: MAI 54/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: American studies, Archaeology, Ethics, Cultural Resources Management
Keywords: Applied anthropology, Cultural resource management, Ethics, Heritage, Heritage management, Interpretation
Publication Number: 1571872
ISBN: 9781321449372