Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

From the dirt road to the ivory tower: Rural students' reflections and motivations for college
by Schulze, Kellie A., Ed.D., Oklahoma State University, 2014, 124; 3641426
Abstract (Summary)

Postsecondary education is viewed by many as a means to a better future. A higher education degree can provide numerous individual benefits such as career mobility, career advancement, better health, and a way to escape poverty (Baum & Ma, 2007). Likewise, people who complete a bachelor's degree earn more money and may have an easier time finding work. These benefits are not being taken advantage of by students who live in rural communities. Students from these communities are attending college at lower rates than their urban peers (McGrath, Swisher, Elder, & Conger, 2001). This research explored the reasons that rural students state for enrolling in a higher education institution. The study also sought to identify the factors that supported rural students' enrollment into a higher education institution including their motivations (both intrinsic and extrinsic), influences they experienced, and other factors they believe helped them achieve entrance into college. Purposeful sampling included six participants currently or previously enrolled as a student at an institution of higher education in Oklahoma within the past five to seven years. Six themes emerged from the data: (1) Expectations, (2) Support, (3) Financial Support (Academics), (4) Financial Support (Need Based), (5) College Isn't For Everyone, (6) Stereotypes and, (7) TRIO Programs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kearney, Kerri
Commitee: Basu, Raj, Krumm, Bernita, Wanger, Stephen
School: Oklahoma State University
Department: Education (all programs)
School Location: United States -- Oklahoma
Source: DAI-A 76/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: School counseling, Higher education
Keywords: Motivations, Reflections, Rural, School counseling
Publication Number: 3641426
ISBN: 9781321276053
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