Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Institutional Isomorphism: A Case Study of a Congregational Leaders' Decision to Change to the Purpose Driven Ministry Model
by Treatch, Richard B., Ed.D., Indiana Wesleyan University, 2014, 223; 3645203
Abstract (Summary)

Organizations seek legitimacy by copying the structure and operational models of similar organizations accepted as legitimate by society. This phenomenon is institutional isomorphism. Institutional isomorphism exists in Protestant congregations in the United States as evidenced by congregations holding to practices and structures identified by denominational bodies and society as legitimate. Leaders of some Protestant denominational congregations in the United States have decided to change their ministry model to the ministry model of another denomination's congregation. Congregations change to these ministry models and self-identify with the congregation with which the model originated. The practice of denominational congregations changing to the ministry model of another denomination is contrary to the theories of institutional isomorphism, which would expect congregations to hold to historically legitimizing denominational practices and structures. This study explored the case of a Protestant congregation of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), located in the United States, which changed to the Purpose Driven ministry model. The case explored the question: "Why did the leaders of Trinity Presbyterian Church decide to change to the Purpose Driven ministry model?"

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Beuthin, Timothy
Commitee: Elliston, Edgar J., Giles, Pamela
School: Indiana Wesleyan University
Department: Organizational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: DAI-A 76/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Religion, Management
Keywords: Church management, Institutional isomorphism, Leadership, Presbyterian church (u.s.a.), Purpose driven ministry model
Publication Number: 3645203
ISBN: 978-1-321-33909-3
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