Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Attitudes and Methods of Political Resistance in Occupy Denver
by Greschner, Catherine Katrina E., M.A., University of Colorado at Denver, 2014, 122; 1563559
Abstract (Summary)

The Occupy Movement arose out of an atmosphere of dissatisfaction with the political and economic structure of the country. The objective of my research was to look at individuals in the Denver Occupy Movement in order to understand what their personal goals for the movement were, as well as what tactics they were willing to partake-in as a way to change society's dominant power structures. A key characteristic in Occupy is how diverse it is in terms of the political will and the express direction its members wish it to go in. My anthropological work is applicable to Occupies across the country as well as other similar socio-political movements since it sheds light on how the individual within the movement expresses his/hers agency not only in shaping acts of resistance but the structure of the movement itself. The theoretical framework of my thesis is based upon three foundational frameworks: Bourdieu's concepts of habitus and various social capitals, Giddens's theory on how agency and structure interact to result in structural change, and concepts in cognitive anthropology. Through these frameworks I show how an individual's background shapes their actions of resistance and mediates how they negotiate the structure and culture of Occupy itself.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brett, John
Commitee: Koester, Steven, Otanez, Marty
School: University of Colorado at Denver
Department: Anthropology
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: MAI 53/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: American studies, Cultural anthropology
Keywords: Occupy Movement, Occupy Wall Street, Para-ethnography, Resistance
Publication Number: 1563559
ISBN: 9781321132151
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