Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Transformational leadership in police sergeants and burnout in subordinate officers
by Jervis, William, Ph.D., Capella University, 2014, 154; 3644129
Abstract (Summary)

Burnout among police officers has been recognized as a problem by organizational psychologists, other social scientists and practitioners. In one analysis, policing represented 2% of the occupations that were researched to establish a relationship with burnout. New lines of research are being developed to examine the contribution of management and supervisory behaviors to stress and burnout. This study investigates the relationship between transformational leadership styles of police sergeants and burnout in their subordinate officers. Burnout was measured across three dimensions: Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Diminished Personal Accomplishment using the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS, 1991). Transformational leadership was measured using the Transformational Leadership Questionnaire, Public Sector Research Version (TLQ-PSRV, 2001). This instrument assesses leadership using 6 scales: Showing Genuine Concern, Networking and Achieving, Enabling, Being Honest and Consistent, Being Accessible, and Being Decisive. Leadership scores were correlated with the dimensions of burnout and Networking and Achieving as well as Being Honest and Consistent were found to be significantly related to Diminished Feelings of Accomplishment at the p = .05 level.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Cree, Lisa
Commitee: DiMatteo, Donna, Nocita, Andrew
School: Capella University
Department: Harold Abel School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 76/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Occupational psychology, Criminology
Keywords: Maslach burnout inventory, Police burnout, Police leadership, Police stress, Transformational leadership
Publication Number: 3644129
ISBN: 978-1-321-32185-2
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest