Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Gender influences on help seeking among men and women with chronic pain
by LaGrange, Sarah J., Ph.D., Indiana University, 2014, 73; 3637160
Abstract (Summary)

Previous research has supported the notion that significantly more women than men seek help for chronic pain. This study aims to understand gender differences in how, when, and from whom individuals seek help for chronic pain. In particular, many aspects of masculinity have been demonstrated to inhibit help seeking. Participants were a sample of patients seeking treatment at a pain treatment facility. It was hypothesized that there would be a greater discrepancy between pain self-reported on paper versus in person by men than would be by women. It was also hypothesized that higher conformity to masculine norms would be positively related to greater self-report discrepancy. Additionally, the author expected to find gender differences in the amount of time between the onset of pain and disclosure of pain as well as medical help seeking. Again, it was anticipated that greater delays in disclosure and medical help seeking would be related to higher conformity to masculine norms. Moreover, conformity to masculine norms was expected to mediate gender differences in help seeking. The author also hypothesized that the type of people to whom pain is first disclosed would differ based on differences in gender and conformity to masculine norms.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Wong, Y. Joel
Commitee: Estell, David, Gilman, Lynn, Gleckman, Ari D., Steinfeldt, Jesse
School: Indiana University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: DAI-B 76/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology, Gender studies, Health care management
Keywords: Chronic pain, Conformity to masculine norms, Gender, Gender influence, Help seeking, Pain
Publication Number: 3637160
ISBN: 9781321196771
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