Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Do demographic variables make a difference in level of violent game play?
by Rowland, Sulma M., Psy.D., Alfred University, 2014, 120; 3636505
Abstract (Summary)

The current study examined the relationship between violent video game exposure and demographic variables including gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES). A 40-item questionnaire was developed in order to measure different aspects of violence in video games. One hundred twenty four students in the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades completed the questionnaire as well as had their parents complete a demographic questionnaire. Factor analysis revealed seven underlying factors of violent exposure on the violent video game questionnaire: Violent Acts, Reinforcement, Audio Violence, Targets, Game Rating, Villain, and Graphics. Results suggested that boys were more likely than girls to be exposed to overall more violent content, violent acts, ability to target certain characters, and audio violence. Weekly gameplay predicted exposure to violent acts, ability to target certain characters, audio violence, and games with a rating of T for Teen and above. Years spent playing video games was a predictor of positive reinforcement for violence. Ethnicity and SES were not significant predictors of exposure to video game violence. The current study provides an option for an objective measure of total violent video game exposure, and suggests that, regardless of SES and ethnicity, children are playing video games that contain violent content.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gaughan, Edward
Commitee: Atlas, Jana, Greil, Arthur L., Lauback, Cris
School: Alfred University
Department: Division of Counseling and School Psychology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-B 76/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology
Keywords: Ethnicity, Gender, Socioeconomic status, Video games
Publication Number: 3636505
ISBN: 9781321181487
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