Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Philanthropy and American schools of business: A study of transformation after a school of business is named in honor of a benefactor
by Driscoll, Michael J., Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2014, 135; 3635739
Abstract (Summary)

Institutions of higher education in the United States seek to obtain new sources of donor support as their traditional sources of funding, beyond student tuition, have come under strain. Given the decline in state and federal funding since 2008, many institutions, and specifically schools of business, have attempted to attract new funds from donors resulting in some of these schools being "named" in honor of these benefactors. Much of the literature regarding philanthropy in higher education focuses on this phenomenon. Additional literature focuses on the change that can occur within organizations. When a college or university announces such a gift, the term "transformative" is often used. This qualitative study examines three schools of business that received naming gifts, and attempts to determine the kinds of transformations anticipated by administrators, faculty, and donors. Whether any transformation takes place because of the gift, the nature of the transformations, faculty and administration participation before, during and after the receipt of the gift, and factors that motivate the donors is examined. The findings point to transformation taking place at the three institutions in the study, but the engagement of the faculty and administrators with a donor appear to be at least as important as the dollar amount of the gift itself.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Eynon, Diane E.
Commitee: Moneta, Laurence, Surie, Gita
School: University of Pennsylvania
Department: Higher Education Management
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 76/01(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education
Keywords: Fundraising, Philanthropy
Publication Number: 3635739
ISBN: 9781321170535
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