Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Gezi Park demonstrations 2013 - A case study of Turkey
by Zimmermann, Cagla, M.A., Webster University, 2014, 128; 1525994
Abstract (Summary)

Social mobilization, which is a "change process" that today occurs in many countries, is commonly explained through social movement theories with most studies emphasizing economic indicators. However, the recent uprising in Taksim Square, Istanbul, which began in May 2013, contradicts these economic explanations of social mobilization, because the Turkish economy is generally considered to be still developing. Against this background, the main goal of the present study is to apply and discuss what previous studies have found with regard to the phenomenon of social mobilization and to suggest that the New Social Movement Theory is one of the most suitable tools to explain this mobilization in the context of Turkey. The study proposes an analysis of the question "What factors contributed to the social mobilization in Gezi Park demonstrations?" by comparing two different time periods, 2003-2005 and 2011-2013, in recent Turkish politics. The analysis concludes that in line with the significant decline in democracy in the country and the increasing conservative policy-making and the authoritarian style of the Government, the demands of individuals changed vividly. A significant number of citizens have felt supressed, unheard and excluded. However, the Gezi Park movement did not occur merely as a defense of identity and different lifestyles but also sought more progressive social change within the country.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pollak, Johannes
Commitee:
School: Webster University
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: MAI 53/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Political science, Sociology
Keywords: Democracy, Demonstrations, Gezi Park, New Social Movement Theory, Social Mobilization, Turkey
Publication Number: 1525994
ISBN: 9781321325621
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