Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Efficacy of Using Enforceable Statements as a High School Classroom Management Technique
by Johnson, Miriam S., Ed.D., Jones International University, 2014, 152; 3632214
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate how well one technique of a classroom management program, the 9 Essential Skills of the Love and Logic Classroom (Fay & Fay, 2002a), fulfilled its claims to reduce teacher stress, decrease student argumentation, and improve teacher-student relationships at the high school level. Faculty members of a rural high school in upstate South Carolina completed pre- and post-study surveys, attended a training seminar, and implemented one technique, the enforceable statement, with students in their existing classes during April and May 2013. Weekly support sessions gave participants opportunities to ask questions and share successes and concerns. A mixed-methods, quasi-experimental study examined the perceptions of the participating high school faculty members to determine if they perceived significant changes in teacher stress, student argumentation, and teacher-student relationships pre- to post-implementation of the treatment. The overall quantitative findings indicated statistically significant differences, while the qualitative narratives provided conclusive evidence that the claims of the Love and Logic Institute are valid as they apply to the implementation of the enforceable statement. The participants further indicated that they found the enforceable statement an effective and positive technique for classroom management. The study was limited to the selected high school and to one Love and Logic classroom management technique. This study contributes to the literature by adding research on the Love and Logic approach at the high school level. The researcher recommends continued training and implementation of the enforceable statement at the selected school and in other high school settings.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kelly, Kathleen
Commitee: Lucas, R. Michael, Revak, Marie
School: Jones International University
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: DAI-A 75/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: School administration, Educational psychology, Teacher education, Secondary education
Keywords: Behavior, Classroom management, Discipline, Disruptive behaviors, Secondary schools
Publication Number: 3632214
ISBN: 978-1-321-11497-3
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