Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Natural Methods of Induction of Labour: Use by Certified Professional Midwives in an Out-of-Hospital Setting
by Andrusiak, Melissa, M.S.M.W., Bastyr University, 2014, 48; 1562614
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of natural induction methods by CPMs in the US for women who began labour intending to deliver out-of-hospital using data collected from the 2004-2009 Midwives Alliance of North America data registry. Almost 60% of the sample used more than one induction method. Frequency of methods used is described with membrane stripping (n=920, 41.5%) and castor oil (n=912, 41.1%) being the most frequently used. Use of method is further broken down by parity; castor oil was the most popular method for nulliparous women (n=266, 46.3%) and membrane stripping was the most popular method for multiparous women (n=696, 42.3%). The use of any induction method versus no method was further explored in the areas of place of birth, mode of birth, gestational age at delivery and region of residence. The results are discussed and related to published literature regarding the use of both natural and pharmacological induction methods. This study does not explore the effectiveness of the methods included or their efficacy in preventing post-term pregnancy. This paper provides a foundation for further research in the areas of the effectiveness and safety, the prevalence of complications that may be associated with induction of labour via natural induction methods, and the length of time from the use of each natural induction method to onset of labour.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gordon, Wendy
Commitee: Hays, Karen
School: Bastyr University
Department: Department of Midwifery
School Location: United States -- Washington
Source: MAI 53/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Medicine, Alternative Medicine
Keywords: Certified professional midwife, Induction of labour, Midwives, Natural induction, Out-of-hospital-birth
Publication Number: 1562614
ISBN: 9781321100792
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