Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Video Game Addiction: Interpersonal Relationship Distress and Coping of Gamers and Loved Ones
by Ross, Mary, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2014, 86; 1560923
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this investigation was to examine relationship distress experienced by pathological gamers and those with interpersonal ties to gamers. This study was also conducted to explore coping strategies implemented by gamers and loved ones of gamers to deal with relationship distress related to gaming. Results indicated that both gamers and loved ones of gamers were most likely to experience unconditionality of regard in their relationship distress and least likely to experience relationship distress related to level of regard. Loved ones of gamers reported overall, more relationships distress than gamers themselves. Analysis of coping strategies revealed that gamers most frequently employ planning, acceptance, and restraint coping; loved ones reported using acceptance, positive reinterpretation and growth, and restraint coping most often, to handle relationship distress related to gaming. Finally, gamers who used positive reinterpretation and growth, venting and focus on emotions, and denial to cope, experienced more interpersonal relationship distress; Loved ones experienced more relationship distress if they employed planning and mental disengagement.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Wrobble, Eric, Alexander, Alicia
Commitee: Alexander, Alicia, DeGroot, Jocelyn, Wrobble, Eric
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Speech Communications
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 53/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Addiction, Coping, Distress, Game, Interpersonal, Relationship
Publication Number: 1560923
ISBN: 978-1-321-04794-3
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