Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Forest communities along soil, acid deposition, and climate gradients of the Appalachian Trail
by Quant, Juliana, M.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 2014, 120; 1560747
Abstract (Summary)

The global issues of acid deposition and climate change call for a greater understanding of the relative influence of broad gradients of acid deposition, climate, soil, and stand characteristics in montane temperate forests. At each of 30 sites along the Appalachian Trail, I measured overstory composition and density (including snags) using the point-centered quarter method (9 plots) and characterized understory species composition and cover (27 plots, 1 m2 each). Analytical approaches included NMS ordination, multiple linear regression, and beta regression. Spruce-fir sites had lower understory richness, lower understory cover, higher cover of strongly acidophytic understory species, and greater regeneration of canopy trees. Temperature affected understory composition and precipitation increased understory cover. The proportion of snags among canopy trees was highest on cool sites with dense canopies. The impact of nitrogenous deposition was limited, but it may have a fertilizer effect. Sites with acidified (high Al) soil had poor canopy regeneration.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Dovciak, Martin, Leopold, Donald J.
Commitee: Lawrence, Gregory B.
School: State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Department: Environmental & Forest Biology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 53/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Ecology, Natural Resource Management, Environmental science
Keywords: Acid deposition, Appalachian forests, Climate, Tree mortality, Tree regeneration, Understory composition
Publication Number: 1560747
ISBN: 9781321044799
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