Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Roles of Family Functioning and Impulsivity in College Students' Problematic Mobile Phone and Internet Use
by Smith, Kirsten E., M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2014, 77; 1560397
Abstract (Summary)

Internet and mobile phone use has become more popular in recent years as technology has become more advanced. Although the DSM-V does not define overuse of the Internet or mobile phone as an addiction, research has suggested that overuse can be problematic and produce symptoms of anxiety, depression, and social isolation. Addictive behaviors have been linked to levels of family functioning and research has found that substance users may have grown up in homes with less family autonomy and intimacy. The current study proposed impulsivity as a moderator in the relationship of family intimacy, family autonomy, problematic Internet use, and problematic mobile phone use. A total of 170 college students completed an online survey. A hierarchal moderated regression analysis was conducted. Results suggested that impulsivity did not significantly moderate the relationship between family functioning and technology use. However, impulsivity was a predictor for both problematic Internet and problematic mobile phone use. Bivariate correlations suggested that as impulsivity levels increased, problematic Internet and mobile phone use increased, and family autonomy and intimacy decreased. Bivariate correlations also suggested that as intimacy levels decreased, Internet use increased.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Segrist, Daniel
Commitee: Brown, Danice, Pomerantz, Andrew
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 53/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Autonomy, Family functioning, Impulsivity, Internet use, Intimacy, Mobile phone use
Publication Number: 1560397
ISBN: 9781321028294
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest