Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Understanding the impact of harambee tradition on the philanthropic activities of Kenyan immigrants in the Twin Cities
by Musau, Crispas Ndungo, Ed.D., Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, 2014, 177; 3623644
Abstract (Summary)

The current hermeneutic qualitative phenomenological study explored the impact of Harambee tradition of philanthropy on the philanthropic activities of Kenyan immigrants in the Twin Cities. The face to face interviews of 12 Kenyan immigrants yielded six themes which illustrated that harambee; skews towards social needs limited to Kenyans and other similar groups, conform to familiarity and comfort, espouse shared responsibility, enhance community participation and mobilization, maintain continuity of philanthropy and harmonizes altruistic behavior and satisfaction. Two subthemes that emerged indicate that harambee is for common good and is not easy to replicate in other settings. The findings of this study show that first-generation Kenyan immigrants continue to practice harambee years after migration. It is recommended that a Kenyan cultural community center be established in the Twin Cities to preserve the Kenyan history and culture as well as to provide avenues for research on Kenyan immigrant issues and other similar groups in the United States.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Updaw, Nelson
Commitee: McClure, John, Ollhoff, James, Pye, Yvette
School: Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Department: Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 75/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Cultural anthropology, Social research, Sub Saharan Africa Studies
Keywords: Haranbee, Immigrants, Kenya, Twin cities
Publication Number: 3623644
ISBN: 9781303962097
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