Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Massive open online courses (MOOCs) and completion rates: are self-directed adult learners the most successful at MOOCs?
by Schulze, Amanda Sue, Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2014, 247; 3622996
Abstract (Summary)

Millions of adults have registered for massive open online courses, known as MOOCs, yet little research exists on how effective MOOCs are at meeting the needs of these learners. Critics of MOOCs highlight that their completion rates can average fewer than 5% of those registered. Such low completion rates raise questions about the effectiveness of MOOCs and whether adults enrolling in them have the skills and abilities needed for success. MOOCs have the potential to be powerful change agents for universities and students, but it has previously been unknown whether these online courses serve more than just the most persistent, self-directed learners. This study explored the relationship between self-directed learning readiness and MOOC completion percents among adults taking a single Coursera MOOC. By examining self-directed learning – the ability to take responsibility for one's own educational experiences – and MOOC completion rates, this research may assist in improving the quality of MOOCs.

A statistically significant relationship was found between self-directed learning and MOOC completion percentages. Those stronger in self-directed learning tended to complete a greater percent of the MOOC examined. In addition, English speaking ability demonstrated a mediating effect between self-directed learning and MOOC completion. Learners indicating a strong ability in speaking English were more likely to be ready for self-directed learning and completed a higher percentage of the MOOC. Compared with those that did not complete MOOCs, however, few additional differences in demographics of adult learners that completed MOOCs were found.

To better understand the skills and experiences needed to be successful in a MOOC, additional research on factors that influence MOOC completion is warranted. If only a minority of strongly self-directed learners can successfully complete MOOCs, then more resources should be invested into the design and development of MOOCs to meet the needs of many learners. If this does not occur, then MOOC completion rates could continue to suffer and new open education solutions of higher quality may appear, making MOOCs a short-lived phenomenon.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Leigh, Doug
Commitee: Sparks, Paul, Spinello, Elio
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 75/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Adult education, Educational technology
Keywords: Adult learners, Attrition, Completion rates, Massive open online courses, Online education, Self-directed learning
Publication Number: 3622996
ISBN: 9781303951992
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