Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Differences in Generational Work Values in America and Their Implications for Educational Leadership: A Longitudinal Test of Twenge's Model
by Fountain, Jason Morgan, D.E., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2014, 142; 3622936
Abstract (Summary)

Three generations of Americans are currently coexisting in the workforce. One of the primary challenges for educational leaders is to understand the similarities and differences in each generation while also educating a new generation of Americans – today's youth. This longitudinal study used data from the General Social Survey to determine if generational work values differ in accord with the five general categories outlined by Twenge.

Several significant differences emerged. First, Millennials rate higher in work ethic over Boomers and GenXers. Additionally, a linear decline from Boomers to Millennials was found in intrinsic values, while Millennials were found to have the highest need for extrinsic values. Finally, a linear decline from Boomers to GenXers to Millennials was evident in relation to social values in the work setting.

The primary implication from this study involves the contradictory nature of Millennials. While they have the highest work ethic, they also rate highest in leisure values and the need for extrinsic values. Further research should be conducted to isolate values pertinent to teachers and a cross-sectional study should be conducted to determine value differences of the current workforce.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Slater, Robert O.
Commitee: Fossey, Richard, Hoffman, Sharon C.
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: DAI-A 75/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership
Keywords: Generational values, Twenge model, Work values
Publication Number: 3622936
ISBN: 9781303950957
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest