Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Information Flow within Nonprofit Organizations and the Role of Evaluation: Creativity from Practice
by Henriquez Prieto, M. Francisca, M.S., University of California, Davis, 2013, 129; 1553350
Abstract (Summary)

This research contributes to the literature on evaluation practice, by reflecting on the role of internal evaluation within organizational communication systems as a whole. A systems theory approach is used to reflect upon the role of internal evaluation, as a means to provide and communicate feedback information. In particular, this study represents exploratory research on the topic of "organic evaluation". Organic evaluation activities are defined in this study as properties that emerge spontaneously within feedback communication systems. Evidence of its practice has been identified within nonprofit organizations operating in Los RĂ­os, Chile. The findings suggest that organic evaluation is conducted to produce and/or communicate feedback information within nonprofit organizations. Findings are also shared regarding needs and constraints that nonprofit organizations face when internally attempting to access, process, and communicate feedback information. Finally, this research highlights the importance in recognizing organic evaluation being conducted within nonprofit organizations in order to formalize its practice and improve feedback communication systems.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Campbell, David
Commitee: Barnett, George, Campbell, David, Deeb-Sossa, Natalia
School: University of California, Davis
Department: Community Development
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 52/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Public policy, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Evaluation, Feedback, Internal evaluation, Nonprofit organizations, Organic evaluation
Publication Number: 1553350
ISBN: 9781303794902
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