Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A phenomenological study of the use of psychological capital in the success of the executive woman's journey
by Morgan, Suzanne, Ph.D., Capella University, 2014, 139; 3617989
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative, phenomenological study examined the psychological success factors of the executive woman as well as the use of psychological capital. Open-ended, semi-structured interviews were conducted to determine what these women considered success strategies and to determine the extent these executives used the tenants of hope, optimism, resilience, and self-efficacy as psychological strategies for success. Twenty female executives with the titles of Vice-President, Senior Vice-President, President, CEO, COO, CNO, Dean, Assistant Dean, and General Counsel were interviewed. The results indicate that determination in hard work, attitude, and risk taking were the most common strategies women listed as contributors to their success. Additionally, all women reported using optimism, resilience, and self-efficacy as means to succeed. Hope was used as a strategy in eighteen of the twenty females, with two females indicating that hope is not a resource they used at all.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Livingood, Rick
Commitee: Braxton-Leiber, Sherri, Gordon, Jean
School: Capella University
Department: School of Business and Technology
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 75/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Business administration, Womens studies, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Business executives, Organizational behavior, Psychological capital, Women executives
Publication Number: 3617989
ISBN: 978-1-303-85963-2
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