Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Effect of Country-Level Income on Domestic Terrorism: A Worldwide Analysis of the Difference Between Lone-Wolf and Group Affiliated Domestic Terrorism
by Stottlemyre, Sonia M., M.P.P., Georgetown University, 2014, 38; 1554444
Abstract (Summary)

Despite vast literature examining causes of terrorism, domestic terrorism has only recently begun to be studied as an entity unto itself. It has long been postulated that a country’s wealth influences its domestic terrorism rates but very little research has backed that claim. Preliminary data suggests that there may be important differences between what leads to domestic attacks conducted by terrorist organizations and attacks conducted by people acting alone. The current study hypothesizes that the relationship between a country’s wealth, as measured by GDP per capita, and its domestic terrorism rate may be different for lone-wolf terrorism than for group-affiliated terrorism. Results support this hypothesis but not in the expected way; per-capita GDP appears to have a non-linear relationship with lone-wolf terrorism and a linear relationship with group-affiliated terrorism. The data were highly sensitive to changes in model specification so caution must be taken when drawing conclusions based on these findings. Although these results are preliminary, they should encourage future researchers to examine the differences between lone-wolf and group-affiliated domestic terrorism to best understand and prevent both phenomena.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Wei, Thomas
Commitee:
School: Georgetown University
Department: Public Policy & Policy Management
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: MAI 52/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Statistics, Economics, Criminology, Public policy
Keywords: Domestic terrorism, GDP, Group-affiliated, Lone-wolf, Regression, Terrorism, Wealth
Publication Number: 1554444
ISBN: 9781303850714
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