Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Assistant Principals and Reform: A Socialization Paradox?
by Best, Marguerita L., Ed.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2013, 158; 3615151
Abstract (Summary)

Framed in the critical race theory of structuration (CRTS), this sequential explanatory mixed methods study seeks to identify the socialization practices by examining the realities of practices of assistant principals and the ways in which they impact the disciplinary actions of assistant principals at middle and high schools. The mixed methods design was used to explore and understand: (1) the realities of practice within the school organization; (2) the socialization processes of assistant principals within the realities of practice; and (3) the ways in which those socialization processes influence their disciplinary practices.

Fifty-one percent of the assistant principals invited to participate in this study completed the online survey. The survey responses led to a focused sample and in-depth interviews with three Black female assistant principals supervised by White male principals. The data from both portions of this study revealed that the structure of the realities of practice and the dimensions of the CRTS coexist and correlate within the school organization. This combination creates a Socialization Paradox Cloud that dictates assistant principals' unwillingness and/or inability to change policy adversely affecting students.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Marshall, Catherine
Commitee: Brown, Kathleen, English, Fenwick
School: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department: Educational Administration
School Location: United States -- North Carolina
Source: DAI-A 75/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, School administration
Keywords: Assistant principals, Barriers, Critical race, Reform, Socialization, Structuration
Publication Number: 3615151
ISBN: 9781303809774
Copyright © 2018 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest