Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Student engagement in an online course and its impact on student success
by Hamane, Angelique C., Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2014, 205; 3615910
Abstract (Summary)

While much has been written about student engagement and its linkage to positive student outcomes—such as higher-order thinking, improved grades, and increased retention and graduation rates in traditional settings—little, if any, research has been done to connect student engagement and online student success. Learning Management Systems (LMSs) have the ability to measure student engagement by tracking frequency of logins, frequency of page visits, and frequency of discussion forum views, posts, and replies. Equally important, students who are aware of their levels of engagement compared to those levels measured by an LMS can self-monitor their progress and prevent the likelihood of failing a course. This initial exploratory study sought to determine whether relationships exist between students’ perceived level of engagement and students’ actual level of engagement as measured by an LMS, students’ perceived level of engagement and student success, and students’ actual level of engagement as measured by an LMS and student success. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to determine type and strength of relationships. Non-probability purposive sampling was used to recruit 38 respondents. Data showed that meaningful findings, which yielded statistically significant, modest or moderate positive partial relationships, occurred in the discussion forums. There were moderate positive relationships between students’ perceived level of engagement and frequency of discussion forum posts and replies, students’ perceived level of total engagement and student success, and students’ frequency of discussion forum views, posts, and replies, and student success. This initial exploratory study is useful in helping to refine future studies and learning more about student engagement levels in an online course and its relationship to positive student outcomes. Results can potentially help administrators and educators in making data-based decisions, and help students self-monitor engagement levels to improve student learning.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Madjidi, Farzin
Commitee: Santos, Jose L., Sparks, Paul
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 75/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation, Educational technology, Higher education
Keywords: Distance education, E-learning, Learning analytics, Online learning, Student engagement, Student success
Publication Number: 3615910
ISBN: 9781303824630
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