Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Comparison of paternal and maternal involvement in a government funded home-based intervention program: A multivariate analysis of parent gender, child gender and age of the child
by Avila, Brissa, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2013, 135; 1527528
Abstract (Summary)

This quantitative study explored the differences in paternal and maternal involvement based on the gender of the child, age of the child (between 0-36 months), and developmental domains in an 8 week period after parents received weekly child development intervention offered by a government funded agency in Southern California for parents of infants/toddlers. A total of 60 parents, 30 female and 30 male, participated in the study. Data was collected from weekly "parent participation forms" submitted by parents to the agency for about 6 months prior to the beginning of the study. The findings revealed some important differences in paternal and maternal involvement and rejected many of the existing stereotypes about lack of paternal involvement in young children's lives. Sampled fathers in the study were found to be more involved in developmental activities in most of the 10 domains of development examined by the study. Their involvement included children of both genders and ages (infants, mobile infants, and toddlers). The findings also indicated that maternal involvement was very close to paternal involvement in some domains especially with infants.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pattnaik, Jyotsna
Commitee: An, Shuhua, Lord, Carol
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Teacher Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 52/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Early childhood education, Individual & family studies
Keywords: Mother and father engagement, Parent involvement
Publication Number: 1527528
ISBN: 9781303795671
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest