Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The hybrid identity development process of college students who live a transborder lifestyle in the San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico border region
by Falcon, Vannessa, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2013, 151; 1527483
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore the essence and underlining structure of a hybrid identity development process among undergraduate students who lived a transborder lifestyle in the U.S.-Mexico border region by identifying the factors that influenced the phenomenon. In the 1990s transnational and transborder individuals were identified by scholars as part of a new understanding for the movement of populations. Today researchers state that this phenomenon is ever most prevalent at the world's busiest international border shared between the cities of San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico. Part of the transborder phenomenon is college students who collaborate internationally between San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico because they reside in both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border while attending higher education institutions in San Diego, California. Currently there is no information about how many students live a transborder lifestyle in the San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico border region and few researchers have explored the understanding of their experiences. As a result, the lack of research about the development of this student population called for further investigation. Semi-structured one-on-one interviews were conducted with twelve undergraduate students who lived a transborder lifestyle in the San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico border region; they took place at a higher education institution in San Diego, California. The central finding of this study is the illustration of the developmental process of a Hybrid Identity; therefore, a conceptual framework for the systematic understanding of the phenomenon was created. The stories which participants shared as part of their interview illustrate how their hybrid identity development was influenced by the transborder lifestyle they lived through the transborder context in the U.S.-Mexico border region. The influential factors of their hybrid identity development are identified as the obstacles they faced through the transborder context and the different ways they coped with and adapted to the barriers of their milieu.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Murray, John
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 52/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Counseling Psychology, Higher education
Keywords: Hybrid Identity Development, Transborder lifestyles, U.S.- Mexico
Publication Number: 1527483
ISBN: 9781303773761
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