Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Surviving the transition from foster care to adulthood: A phenomenological study
by Santee, Veronica Vonciele, Ph.D., University of Phoenix, 2013, 150; 3585974
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore the perceptions of foster care support services providers about the most effective support services for transitioning wards from foster care to independent living. Set in a suburb of a large metropolitan area, the data for the study were from pre-interview questionnaires and audio recorded interviews of 10 foster care support services providers. Data collected underwent analysis using NVivo 9 software to identify emerging themes from the interview and to collate the common practices and most effective support services for transitioning from foster care to independent living. The five central themes resulting from 10 participants’ answers to interview and pre-interview questions included (a) beginning the emancipation process, (b) monitoring the emancipation process, (c) primary sources for a successful transition, (d) barriers hindering the successful transition, and (e) tactics developed to improve the transitional outcome. The study findings have implications for foster care support services providers’ leadership. Foster care agencies could hold collaborative meetings every month in a community facility such as a school, church, or hall, to maintain a visual on goal setting practices and to provide foster youth a sense of security and safety to improve the desire to succeed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Khalil, Yehia
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 75/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work, Developmental psychology, Sociology
Keywords: Adulthood, Aging out of foster care, Foster care, Foster youth, Leaving foster care
Publication Number: 3585974
ISBN: 978-1-303-79122-2
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