Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Somatic Relationship Between Mind-Body Therapists and Their Parents: A Grounded Theory Study
by Cockburn, Wade H., Ph.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2013, 191; 3611332
Abstract (Summary)

This study researched the subjective somatic experience of sensory awareness-trained therapists' interactions with their parents when encountering an issue that first arose during the therapist's childhood. It explored whether and how the therapists are aware of, sense, and identify their own body consciousness, and whether and how they utilize various somatic psychological practices to address present-day familial issues with their parent or parents. In addition to the usual verbal narrative, somatic psychology considers bodily states of consciousness, physical reactions, muscular patterning, chronic tension, speech patterns, breath, skin color and tone, and the use of bodily space in the therapy process. Thus, somatic psychology provides an integrated approach to exploring and healing the complex relationship between the mind and body. Such an approach is appropriate in adult child-parent relationship issues. Sensory awareness is a specific therapeutic technique used to identify feelings and sensations that occur in the present moment.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sieck, Michael
Commitee: Brooks, Christine, Knighton, Edmund
School: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Department: Somatic Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-B 75/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology
Keywords: Adult children, Mind-body therapy, Parents, Sensory awareness, Somatic relationships
Publication Number: 3611332
ISBN: 978-1-303-71886-1
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