Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

California glacial till and the glaciated valley landsystem: Engineering classification and properties
by Lattin, Matthew M., M.C.E., San Jose State University, 2013, 123; 1552263
Abstract (Summary)

The engineering characteristics of glacial tills in the Sierra Nevada are difficult to determine due to the depositional nature of the material; however, testing methods unique to these dense materials can be utilized to obtain good engineering data. A literature review was conducted to determine testing methods and recommendations for engineering in glacial till. Further literature review revealed a significant amount of glacial deposits mapped by the USGS and CGS in the Sierra Nevada geomorphic province in California. Sierra Nevada glacial till field and lab data were obtained from Taber Consultants along with samples for further testing. Consequently, four significant conclusions were determined from testing and research. First, it was determined that Sierra Nevada glacial deposits may have large amounts of clay due to neoformation of the local volcanic rockform. As a result, plasticity and compressibility results ranged from low to high. Second, SPT N values for matrix material were correlated with depth. Third, unconfined compressive strength results for coarse-grained samples with no cohesive binding were independent of depth. Fourth, the matrix material dominated the engineering behavior of a given glacial till layer.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sullivan-Green, Laura
Commitee: McIlroy, Martin M., McMullin, Kurt
School: San Jose State University
Department: Engineering
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 52/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Geology, Geological, Civil engineering
Keywords: California, Engineering, Glacial till, Glaciated valley, Landsystems
Publication Number: 1552263
ISBN: 9781303715143
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