Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Follow the white rabbit: An ethnographic exploration into the drug culture concealed within the "deep Web"
by Backman, Brent, M.A., University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2013, 140; 1551711
Abstract (Summary)

In order to be successful in the fight against drugs we must understand how the drug problem continues to evolve in the 21st century. Today, with access to the deep Web portion of the Internet, drug users no longer need to have face-to-face communication with their dealers, and hard cash in their wallets in order to get their fix. Just like buying a book from Amazon, marijuana, cocaine, or heroin can now be delivered securely to your front door by the U.S. Postal Service. Over the last decade there have been no shortages of studies about the deep Web from the health, criminal justice, and computer science disciplines. Additionally, there have been many news stories about the public FBI arrest of the Dread Pirate Roberts and the follow-on U.S. government seizure of his popular deep Web drug market, the Silk Road. Though helpful for general public awareness and to their field of study, these reviews typically limit cultural aspects. This study addresses this issue by exploring how the deep Web drug subculture was affected during the immediate days following the U.S. government seizure of the Silk Road market. The findings express the personal side of what the members of this culture went through and provide critical insights into this emerging form of crime and the communication and trust that shapes the subculture.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lipschultz, Jeremy H.
Commitee: Simi, Pete, Toller, Page
School: University of Nebraska at Omaha
Department: Communication
School Location: United States -- Nebraska
Source: MAI 52/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Criminology, Computer science
Keywords: Bitcoins, Black-market, Deep web, Dread pirate roberts, Drug market, Silk road
Publication Number: 1551711
ISBN: 9781303702242
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest