Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Sticky IT Workers: Discovering Why Information Technology Professionals Retain Their Employers
by Lewis, Phillip Mike, D.Mgt., George Fox University, 2013, 157; 3578080
Abstract (Summary)

In the current business climate and social technologies expansion era, Information Technology (IT) workers are important organization contributors that connect organizations into today’s data-driven, highly social, and always-on global economy. Thus, organizations need IT workers. Unfortunately, as a class, IT workers have developed a reputation that includes short organization tenures. However, not all IT workers suffer this stigma, some IT workers stick with one organization for a long time. Discovering why these Sticky IT workers retain their employers provides insights and direction for organization leaders and architects to help them shape their organizations into those that IT workers choose to stick with.

In this phenomenology, Sticky IT workers were interviewed to discover and describe organization qualities that are important them. That is, the research investigated,” Why do you stay?” which distinguishes it from research that asks, “Why did you leave?” or “Why do you intend to leave?” Seven themes emerged from the investigations - learning, people, pay, career, opportunity, environment, and organization - to collectively provide organization leaders and architects a priority-ranked map of organization qualities that lead to increased IT worker tenures.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Rahschulte, Tim
Commitee: Rennaker, Mark, Steele, Jim
School: George Fox University
Department: Management
School Location: United States -- Oregon
Source: DAI-A 75/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Information Technology, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Employee retention, Employee turnover, Sticky employee, Technology and information workers, Worker attrition
Publication Number: 3578080
ISBN: 9781303685422
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest